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5TH WORKSHOP ON TRUST WITHIN AND BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONS


MADRID, SPAIN, JANUARY 28-29, 2010
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS

Ranjay Gulati
Jaime and Josefina Chua Tiampo Professor of Business Administration
Harvard Business School, USA

Sirkka L. Jarvenpaa
Bayless/Rauscher Pierce Refsnes Chair in Business Administration, Information, Risk and Operations Mgmt 
University of Texas at Austin, USA

Denise M. Rousseau
H.J.Heinz II Professor of Organizational Behavior and Public Policy Director, Project on Evidence-based Organizational Practices,
Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, USA

CHAIRPERSONS

Katinka Bijlsma-Frankema
Professor of Organization Sciences at EIASM
Associate professor of Organization Theory, Dpt. of Organization Science
Free University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Sim Sitkin
Professor of Management and
Faculty Director, Center of Leadership and Ethics
Fuqua School of Business
Duke University Durham - North Carolina - USA

LOCAL HOST

Jose Maria Peiro
Professor at the University of Valencia, Spain

HOSTING ORGANISATION



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BACKGROUND

In the past decade, issues of trust in inter- and intra-organizational relationships have been increasing in importance on the agendas of organizational scholars, legitimated by changes in the social structure of societies, economic exchange relations and organizational forms. Due to deterioration in the binding power of reciprocal obligations, of hierarchical relations and of social institutions relying on hierarchy to sanction deviant behavior, other mechanisms seem to be required to support co-operative behavior in interactions. Within firms, lateral relationships and alliances are growing in importance, while new linkages between firms are being formed to achieve and maintain competitive advantage in the marketplace. In network forms and alliances, organizational performance becomes increasingly dependent on trustful relations between individuals and groups. A related development is the globalization and virtualization of markets and relations within and between organizations. Emerging ‘new communities’ like virtual teams and global business networks may bring new problems and related trust requirements that permanently challenge current insights within the field.

By establishing an international forum for scholars from different disciplines, the workshop series seeks to make a contribution to the development of an international research program on ‘Trust within and between Organizations.’ The first four Amsterdam workshops on this theme, organized in 2001, 2003, 2005 and 2007, each succeeded in bringing together scholars from over 20 countries and a wide range of disciplines, such as economics, marketing, work and organization psychology, sociology of organizations, political sciences, information sciences and linguistics. At the first workshop, the participants decided to organize themselves in FINT, the First International Network on Trust. FINT aims to further international cooperation in trust theory and research (for membership, mail to : r.zolin@qut.edu.au).

FINT members have since organized tracks on trust at 2002 and 2003 EURAM conferences, 2004 till 2008 EGOS colloquia, and symposia at the Academy of Management 2002, 2005, 2007 and 2008 meetings. FINT actively aims to further publications on trust, preferably co-authored by scholars from different countries. Workshop- and track papers have been brought together in special issues on trust of Personnel Review (2003, vol 32, 5), Journal of Managerial Psychology (2004, vol 19, 6) and Strategic Change (2005), an edited volume on ‘Trust under pressure (Edward Elgar, 2005) and special issues on ‘Trust and control’ of International Sociology (2005) and Group and Organization Management (2007). Currently FINT members have taken initiatives to edit a Handbook on Trust Research Methodology , to be published by Edward Elgar, and a volume about Trust across Cultures, to be published by Cambridge University Press.

PROGRAMME

Please cliclk HERE to download the workshop programme. 

GENERAL CALL FOR PAPERS

Trust scholars are invited to submit an abstract on any topic within the broad field of ‘Trust within and between organizations’ and to help make this workshop an inspiring event. The expansion of trust research and the variety of topics studied by scholars nowadays makes us look forward to meet you again or to meet you anew, curious after ideas, arguments and findings you will bring to the table. We will organize the submissions in thematic sessions, dependent on the themes covered by the papers. Next to this general call for papers, there are ten calls for contributions to special theme sessions, all very worthy of the special attention proposed.

At the workshop, moreover, two core members of FINT, Guido Möllering and Fergus Lyon, will organize a panel session on ‘Trust and Research Methods,’ about which participants of the workshop will hear in due course.

It is hoped that at the workshop further exchanging of theoretical ideas, research methods and findings will produce new exciting knowledge, new forms of collaboration, and new publications.
 

The submission deadlline is over.

By June 25 they will receive a notification of acceptance/rejection.
Final papers of 6.000-10.000 words and 1,5 spacing should be uploaded at this website by November 21 2009.

The following information is required in the abstract:
- Title of paper.
- Name, academic affiliation(s) and address of author(s).
- E-mail address of each author

 

SPECIAL SESSION(S) I: TRUST AND REPUTATIONS

CHAIRS:

Karen S. Cook, Department of Sociology, Stanford University, Stanford CA, USA
Coye Cheshire, IS School, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley CA, USA

Trust and Reputation is an important area of investigation in organizational research and in the work on network forms of social and economic organization. We invite papers on this broad topic that address the links between trust and various reputation mechanisms in organizations and networks. Under some circumstances reputations can substitute for trust and it is important to understand the conditions under which this is the case. In addition, both positive and negative reputations should be the focus of discussion since negative reputations can limit trust and fuel distrust. This session is open to participants from any social science field. In particular, we are interested in attracting papers that focus on various levels and contexts in which trust and reputations matter: at the interpersonal level, within and between organizations, and at the international level. The contexts could include alliances between organizations or states, interactions of various sorts over the Internet or person to person interactions within small or large organizations or networks. Empirical papers using a range of methods are welcome from ethnographic and qualitative to more quantitative studies (including simulations) of the links between trust and reputation.

Authors intending to participate are requested to upload an 800-1000 words abstract of their work by June 1 2009.
By June 20 they will receive a notification of acceptance/rejection. Final papers of 6.000-10.000 words and 1,5 spacing should be uploaded at this website by November 21 2009.

The following information is required in the abstract:
- Title of paper.
- Name, academic affiliation(s) and address of author(s).
- E-mail address of each author

If you want to submit an abstract to this special session, please go to the "call for papers" section and upload your abstract electronically.

Please do not forget to mention that it is submitted for THIS SPECIAL SESSION by using the 'scroll down menu' you will see when submitting.

SPECIAL SESSION(S) II: TRUST AND CONTROL IN ORGANIZATIONAL RELATIONSHIPS

CHAIRS:

Ana Cristina Costa, Brunel University of West London, London, UK.
Sabine T. Köszegi, University of Vienna, Austria

In the past decades, scholarly thinking about governance of intra and inter-organizational relations has changed from an almost myopic focus on control to recognizing trust as a valid alternative mechanism that particularly in situations of interdependence and risk proves its worth. Developments such as globalization, virtualization of work relationships, team based forms across boundaries have curbed the effectiveness of control-based forms of governance in favor of trust-based forms.

Currently, trust and control are commonly accepted as important means to deal with perceived risks in inter- and intra-organizational relations. However, the relation between trust and control is a complex one and research has given rise to various and contradictory interpretations of how these factors relate. A well-known discussion is directed at whether trust and control are better conceived of as substitutes or as complementary mechanisms of governance. Recent research has demonstrated that trust brings important benefits for individuals, teams, and organizations. However, recent events in the financial economic markets raise questions about the effectiveness of trust as a stand-alone model for organizational relations.

The aim of this track is to look into take the matter of how trust and control are related one step further, by bringing together theoretical and empirical studies reflection how trust and control relate in organizational relations. To highlight the importance of theoretically innovative and empirically rigorous research on the relationship between these two constructs, papers are invited that address relevant topics regarding this relationship, such as:

•Theoretical models describing the relation between trust and control in inter- organizational, organizational and interpersonal work relationships;

•Identification of key variables that determine the effectiveness of trust and control mechanisms;

•The role of leadership—formal and informal—on the emergence of trust and control;

• Different roles of trust and control within horizontal vs. vertical work relationships;

•Benefits and limitations of trust and control mixes in different contexts.

NB: This list is illustrative, not exhaustive.

Authors intending to participate are requested to upload an 800-1000 words abstract of their work by June 1 2009.
By June 20 they will receive a notification of acceptance/rejection. Final papers of 6.000-10.000 words and 1,5 spacing should be uploaded at this website by November 21 2009.

The following information is required in the abstract:
- Title of paper.
- Name, academic affiliation(s) and address of author(s).
- E-mail address of each author

If you want to submit an abstract to this special session, please go to the "call for papers" section and upload your abstract electronically.

Please do not forget to mention that it is submitted for THIS SPECIAL SESSION by using the 'scroll down menu' you will see when submitting.

SPECIAL SESSION(S) III: TRUST IN THE CONTEXT OF NEGOTIATION AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION

CHAIRS:

Kurt Dirks, Washington University in St. Louis, USA
Don Ferrin, Singapore Management University, Singapore
Deepak Malhotra, Harvard Business School, USA

Organizational scholars have made great strides in understanding the development of trust, the functioning and consequences of trust, as well as how it can be repaired after it has been damaged. The continued growth in research on this topic is premised on the notion that trust is critical for cooperative interaction within and between groups and organizations. As a consequence, one context in which further research aimed at a better understanding of trust is likely to be particularly valuable is the context of negotiation and conflict resolution.
Most negotiations entail mixed-motive interaction: parties compete when their interests are at odds, but also cooperate to leverage compatible interests and create value. To do so effectively, parties must take risks as they share confidential information and structure agreements which require good-faith efforts of each party. These same dynamics apply in negotiations and conflicts of all types: between leaders and subordinates, among employees, between labor and management, between organizations, between governments, between government leaders and their citizens and between various other stakeholders of organizations. These situations share a common irony: the risks inherent in these relationships make trust more critical and valuable, but also make it more difficult to build and maintain it. This sets up a fascinating and important challenge for organizational researchers to tackle.
Scholars have made some progress in understanding the antecedents and consequences of trust in the context of negotiation and conflict resolution, but both the breath and the depth of knowledge is far from adequate. And, considering the importance that practitioners assign to the role of trust in negotiation and conflict resolution, additional academic research on the topic seems imperative.
We seek submissions that contribute theoretical and/or empirical insights about trust in the context of negotiation and conflict resolution, broadly defined. This may, for instance, involve issues related to how trust is developed in negotiation and conflict situations, when and how trust affects negotiation and conflict outcomes, and how trust (or mistrust) may be managed or repaired by parties to a negotiation or conflict.

Authors intending to participate are requested to upload an 800-1000 words abstract of their work by June 1 2009.
By June 20 they will receive a notification of acceptance/rejection. Final papers of 6.000-10.000 words and 1,5 spacing should be uploaded at this website by November 21 2009.

The following information is required in the abstract:
- Title of paper.
- Name, academic affiliation(s) and address of author(s).
- E-mail address of each author

If you want to submit an abstract to this special session, please go to the "call for papers" section and upload your abstract electronically.

Please do not forget to mention that it is submitted for THIS SPECIAL SESSION by using the 'scroll down menu' you will see when submitting.

SPECIAL SESSION(S) IV: THEORIZING ABOUT TRUST ACROSS CONTEXTS

CHAIRS:
Richard Priem, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, USA
Antoinette Weibel, University of Liechtenstein, Liechtenstein
Reinhard Bachmann, University of Surrey, UK

Academic disciplines must deal simultaneously with two imperatives: separation and integration (Sen, 2007, Economica). The separation imperative requires identifying and sharply defining the differences that make research questions unique, and then analyzing each distinct issue individually. The integration imperative requires identifying interrelationships that may exist across distinct issues, thereby analyzing them collectively.

Bamberger (2008, AMJ) recently argued that management theory could be advanced by moving from simply identifying the context within which a distinct phenomenon is analyzed to instead developing theories that incorporate differences in the phenomenon across contexts. He defines “context theories” as “those theories that specify how surrounding phenomena or temporal conditions directly influence lower-level phenomena, condition relations between one or more variables at different levels of analysis, or are influenced by the phenomena nested within them.”

Trust researchers have been especially effective in identifying and sharply defining trust-related questions for study (i.e., the separation imperative). Such topics include: trust processes (e.g., formation, maintenance, dissolution and repair), trust at different levels of analysis (e.g., individual, group, organization), dimensions of trustworthiness (e.g., ability, benevolence, integrity), types of trust (e.g., unconditional, conditional, distrust), temporal differences (e.g., swift trust) and many more.

The central theme underlying this track involves “context theories” that might further integrate the trust literature by identifying interrelationships among previously-separate trust constructs, levels or questions (i.e., the integration imperative). Submissions are invited which examine context theories of trust at the individual, group, organization, institutional or societal levels, or across multiple levels, and they may focus on context differences based on: process characteristics, trust dimensions, trust types, time issues or other differences in setting that may affect aspects of trust. In addition to empirical research, we are calling for and encouraging conceptual and theoretical papers, and insightful reviews of existing relevant theory and research. Multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary contributions are encouraged, including contributions from psychology, sociology, organizational behavior and theory, critical management, political science, and economics.

Possible research issues and questions include:

• In which situations are trust-related processes made salient, and why? For example, we might speculate that for organizational newcomers issues of trust achieve high pertinence, yet it is far less clear under which circumstances regular employees question trust again. Under which conditions is the taken-for-grantedness of trust shaken? When and why is the inertia related to distrust moved?

• How might the relative importance of trustworthiness dimensions (as characteristics of a person/group/institution) be affected by context? In what sorts of contexts, for example, are ability more important or less important than benevolence or integrity to perceptions of trustworthiness, and why?

• How does an individual’s trust in one member of an organization affect that individual’s expectations of group or organizational trustworthiness? How does trust in an organization affect trust in individual members?

• Why do individuals in some societies/organizations/groups trust even strangers to watch out for their interests, while individuals in other societies/organizations/groups use distrust as the default condition for strangers? In which situation will an individual predisposition to trust gain in importance, and why? What is needed for trusting individuals to unleash positive spirals of interpersonal trust in organizations? How might an interactionist approach be applied to trust theory?

• According to Lewicki et al. (1998), one may simultaneously trust and distrust the same individual for differing tasks. How might context influence such differential trust, and why?

• How is trust in organizations related to trust in individuals? Under which circumstances might a lack of trust in the organization or distrust in the organization taint trust in its organizational members? In which situation can trust in focal organizational members substitute for trust in the organization (or even cover a lack of trust in the organization), and why?

Authors intending to participate are requested to upload an 800-1000 words abstract of their work by June 1 2009.
By June 20 they will receive a notification of acceptance/rejection. Final papers of 6.000-10.000 words and 1,5 spacing should be uploaded at this website by November 21 2009.

The following information is required in the abstract:
- Title of paper.
- Name, academic affiliation(s) and address of author(s).
- E-mail address of each author

If you want to submit an abstract to this special session, please go to the "call for papers" section and upload your abstract electronically.
Please do not forget to mention that it is submitted for THIS SPECIAL SESSION by using the 'scroll down menu' you will see when submitting.

SPECIAL SESSION(S) V: TRUST AND RETRENCHMENT

CHAIRS

Aneil Mishra, Michigan State University, US
Karen Mishra, Meredith College, US

Organizational downsizing continues to remain a pervasive aspect of work. In the US, for instance, during the 12 years from 1996 through 2007 in which data have been collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), there have been more than 63,000 extended mass layoff events, in which 12.5 million jobs have been eliminated. Although fourth-quarter figures were not available from the BLS at this time, 2008 will undoubtedly have even more downsizings and jobs eliminated than in 2007, with the number of extended layoffs being 25 percent greater during the first nine months of the year as compared with the same nine-month period in 2007 (http://www.bls.gov/news.release/mslo.nr0.htm). Although the financial services sector in 2008 had the largest number of layoffs in the first nine months of year, with more than 111,000 layoffs, downsizing was widespread in a number of industries including automotive (95,000 layoffs), government/non-profit (67,000), transportation (62,000), retail (51,000), computer (44,000), and health care/products (33,000) (New York Times, 10/25/08). With the continued downturn in the economy and poor retail sales figures for the 2008 holidays, both 2008 and 2009 will most likely exceed the annual downsizings for the three-year period 2000-2002 in which more than 1.25 million jobs were eliminated each year.

Even as organizations continue to downsize apace, the stated goals of downsizing efforts that have been documented (Mishra, Spreitzer & Mishra, 1998) remain: reducing total costs, increasing labor productivity, improving quality, and enhancing the efficiency with which capital is employed. During the downsizing process, Mishra, Spreitzer & Mishra (1998) advocated for openness and honesty about the state of the business, the reasons for the downsizing, the process by which the downsizing would take place, and the future of the business. This open and honest communication would be essential to building the trust and empowerment of both those who were designated to leave, as well as those who would remain to “survive.” This trust and empowerment in turn would create a positive set of responses by the survivors to the downsizing, and mitigate any negative reactions by them (Mishra & Spreitzer, 1998)

In this track we explore the unexamined questions that remain about how trust is built or destroyed downsizing and other retrenchment efforts. With the global economy in such poor shape, we use the terms downsizing and retrenchment interchangeably here. Papers which further our understanding of any aspect of this topic are invited. In addition to empirical research and case studies, we welcome conceptual and theoretical papers which offer insights into existing relevant theory and research. Topics which would be of interest include:
• Who is responsible for inspiring trust in the workforce—top management or those front-line managers who are directly responsible for implementing retrenchment efforts?
• How can tensions and interests among customers, suppliers, and employees be managed as part of trust-building efforts during downsizing/retrenchment?
• How is human capital measured in an organization during retrenchment? How can these measures be integrated into downsizing or retrenchment decisions?
• How do job and task flexibility during retrenchment help or repair trust between employees and top management? How does such flexibility allow the stages of downsizing (Mishra, Spreitzer & Mishra, 1998) to be more fluid?
• What methods of communication best preserve trust during downsizing and retrenchment?
• How can front-line managers be supported as linking pins (Likert, 1967) to build and preserve the trust that exists between them and their employees?


Authors intending to participate are requested to upload an 800-1000 words abstract of their work by June 1 2009.
By June 20 they will receive a notification of acceptance/rejection. Final papers of 6.000-10.000 words and 1,5 spacing should be uploaded at this website by November 21 2009.

The following information is required in the abstract:
- Title of paper.
- Name, academic affiliation(s) and address of author(s).
- E-mail address of each author

If you want to submit an abstract to this special session, please go to the "call for papers" section and upload your abstract electronically.

Please do not forget to mention that it is submitted for THIS SPECIAL SESSION by using the 'scroll down menu' you will see when submitting.

SPECIAL SESSION(S) VI: TRUST IN BUYER-SELLER RELATIONSHIPS

CHAIRS

Sandro Castaldo, Bocconi University, SDA School of Management, Milan, Italy
Fabrizio Zerbini, Bocconi University, SDA School of Management, Milan, Italy
Guido Möllering, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies, Köln, Germany

Vertical relationships between organizations are an elective setting to understand the conditions and modalities through which trust affects economic exchanges.
Since the earlier studies, this field has grown significantly over time, allowing gathering a comprehensive view of relevant trust antecedents, processes of evolution over time, and consequences. Such a growth is becoming increasingly interdisciplinary, as the earliest studies within the body of organization theory have been sided in more recent times by endeavours of strategic management as well as marketing scholars. Relationship marketing itself owes much to prominent research on trust, commitment, and other relevant constructs such as satisfaction and loyalty, which offers a rationale to organizations’ endeavours in building and maintaining over time successful relationships.

Research on trust in buyer-seller relationships is by no means mature yet, however. Several questions are posed by managers of corporations, either buying or selling organizations, and do not find yet sound theories providing convincing arguments, nor empirical patterns.

For instance, why does it happens that most buyers and sellers, in spite of the promising avenue of sharing a trustworthy setting of interaction, are increasingly far away from it and decline in a lot of cases towards conflicting, mistrusting interaction? Why a few of them rely instead on third parties and refuse to control directly the interaction with the counterpart? To what extent the actual context of interaction between buyers and sellers is well represented in current frameworks on trust in buyer-seller relationships? What elements could broaden the picture and help to mirror the emphasis that trust received thus far at the scholarly level with a consistent diffusion of trust organization and management model in practice?

In this track, we are seeking for work-in progress and late stage of development research, oriented towards theory testing as well as theory generation, which allow to critically think at trust inhibition, evolution, and optimization within the context of buyer-seller relationships.

Submissions are expected to address, although not exclusively, topics and research questions such as the following ones:
• How does multiplexity of buyer-seller relationships modify, if it does, current theories on trust within and between organizations?
• What are the implications for organizing buyer-seller relationships, once the assumption that inter-personal trust equals inter-organizational trust is removed?
• How do organizations deal with trust inconsistencies across individual and functional levels of the vertical relationship?
• How do organizations could prevent to be expropriated by individuals owning and controlling a trustworthy relationship with their own business partners?
• What structures and processes enable organizations to overcome the abandonment of boundary spanners, which were formerly owners of a trustful relationship with their exchange counterparty?
• How does trust apply to the level of multi-party and network relationships?
• How do firms organize for managing trust once interaction switch towards or begins with the involvement of third parties besides the dyad?
• Do third parties substitute or rather integrate trust within the dyadic relationships? To what extent they facilitate the maintenance of trust?
• How do relationship dynamics, either conceived as cycles or seasons, can be managed without spoiling the relationships from trust?

Authors intending to participate are requested to upload an 800-1000 words abstract of their work by June 1 2009.
By June 20 they will receive a notification of acceptance/rejection. Final papers of 6.000-10.000 words and 1,5 spacing should be uploaded at this website by November 21 2009.

The following information is required in the abstract:
- Title of paper.
- Name, academic affiliation(s) and address of author(s).
- E-mail address of each author

If you want to submit an abstract to this special session, please go to the "call for papers" section and upload your abstract electronically.

Please do not forget to mention that it is submitted for THIS SPECIAL SESSION by using the 'scroll down menu' you will see when submitting.

SPECIAL SESSION(S) VII: COOPERATION AND TRUST IN SMALL AND NEW ENTERPRISES

CHAIRS:

Matthias Fink, Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration, Austria
Teemu Kautonen, University of Vaasa, Finland

Cooperative business relationships are at the same time a great opportunity and a serious risk. This is especially true for small enterprises and new business ventures. On the one hand, cooperative strategies can be of vital strategic importance for new and small enterprises and impact positively on their performance. For example, by pooling critical resources such as know-how, production capacities or reputation, partners may come up with unique combinations that generate competitive advantages or allow them to overcome the liabilities of newness and smallness which otherwise restrict their ability to compete with larger and more established companies in the market. On the other hand, the commitment to a specific cooperation arrangement brings about specific investments and therefore bears a degree of risk. The key to success in cooperative relationships is an efficient and effective coordination of the actors’ behaviour within the scope of the cooperation arrangement. Given the limited means for hierarchical or formal coordination in new and small firms, scholars often argue that trust is a particularly well-suited social mechanism for behavioural coordination in this context.

This special session aims to contribute to a better understanding of the definition, prerequisites, functioning and effects of trust-based inter-firm cooperation in the context of new and small enterprises. The Chairs welcome both theoretical and empirical papers (both quantitative and qualitative approaches are welcome) and particularly encourage authors to present innovative conceptual work that challenges the dominant ideas in the mainstream literature.

Some of the specific questions that this session seeks to address include, but are not limited to:

•  How can small and new ventures set up successful trust-based cooperative relationships? 
•  What criteria and processes do new and small enterprises apply to identify the right partner?
•  What means do and can entrepreneurs and owner-managers apply to ensure that their partners behave in the agreed, and therefore, expected manner?
•  How does trust emerge and evolve in inter-firm co-operations?
•  How can trust-based cooperative relationships be evaluated?


Authors intending to participate are requested to upload an 800-1000 words abstract of their work by June 1 2009.
By June 20 they will receive a notification of acceptance/rejection. Final papers of 6.000-10.000 words and 1,5 spacing should be uploaded at this website by November 21 2009.

The following information is required in the abstract:
- Title of paper.
- Name, academic affiliation(s) and address of author(s).
- E-mail address of each author

If you want to submit an abstract to this special session, please go to the "call for papers" section and upload your abstract electronically.

Please do not forget to mention that it is submitted for THIS SPECIAL SESSION by using the 'scroll down menu' you will see when submitting.

SPECIAL SESSION(S) VIII: TRUST AT THE ORGANIZATIONAL LEVEL

CHAIRS:

Denise Skinner, Coventry University, UK
Nicole Gillespie, Melbourne Business School, Australia.
Rosalind Searle, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, UK
Deanne N. Den Hartog, University of Amsterdam Business School, The Netherlands

Barney and Hansen (1994) have argued that for an organization to survive long term it needs to be trusted by its key stakeholders, such as investors, employees, customers and suppliers. To date, enormous energy has been devoted to researching interpersonal trust in organizational contexts. Yet despite widespread recognition that trust operates at multiple levels (see Rousseau, Sitkin, Burt & Camerer, 1998), and that an organization’s reputation for trustworthiness is a key “source of competitive advantage” (Barney & Hansen 1994: 175), research has been slow to systematically and conceptually unpacked the notion of organization-level trust (OT) as distinct from interpersonal trust. At present, there is no clear consensus on the concept of trust / trustworthiness at the organizational level, nor is there coherent theory or empirical research to guide an understanding of the factors which influence it.

Recent and emerging work has started to unpack the concept of OT and identify its determinants. For example, Gillespie and Dietz (2009) propose that employees’ perceptions of organizational trustworthiness are influenced by cues sent by six key system components, including organizational leadership, culture, strategy; structures and policies, external governance; and its public reputation. In a study of 787 European managers, Searle et al., (2008) found that both high involvement HR practices (e.g. information sharing, employee participation, job security, incentive compensation, training and flexible work arrangements) and procedural fairness contribute directly to employees’ trust in the employer.

This track aims to stimulate research and debate on the hitherto underdeveloped conceptual and empirical topic of organizational trust, as well as provide practical insights into how to build and repair an organization’s reputation for trust. We invite submissions that advance our understanding of the nature, antecedents, dynamics, processes and/or outcomes of trust at the organizational level. In addition to empirical research, we welcome conceptual and theoretical papers, and insightful reviews of existing relevant theory and research. Multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary contributions are encouraged, including contributions from psychology, sociology, organizational behavior and theory, critical management, and economics. Examples of relevant questions to be addressed include:

• How can OT be defined and in what ways (if any) does trust at the organizational level differ to interpersonal conceptions?
•  What are the antecedents and dimensions of OT? To what extent do they vary across organizational, institutional and cultural contexts?
• Do the antecedents and/or processes required to build and repair trust vary across different stakeholder groups
(e.g. employees, customers, investors, suppliers etc)? How can and do organizations deal with incompatible expectations from various stakeholder groups and with what effect?
• How can organizations repair a reputation for trustworthiness once damaged?
•  What role do HR practices, and formal and informal controls play in building and repairing
trust in organizations?


Authors intending to participate are requested to upload an 800-1000 words abstract of their work by June 1 2009.
By June 20 they will receive a notification of acceptance/rejection. Final papers of 6.000-10.000 words and 1,5 spacing should be uploaded at this website by November 21 2009.

The following information is required in the abstract:
- Title of paper.
- Name, academic affiliation(s) and address of author(s).
- E-mail address of each author

If you want to submit an abstract to this special session, please go to the "call for papers" section and upload your abstract electronically.

Please do not forget to mention that it is submitted for THIS SPECIAL SESSION by using the 'scroll down menu' you will see when submitting.

SPECIAL SESSION(S) IX : WHEN TRUST MAKES SENSE IN INTER-FIRM RELATIONS (AND WHEN NOT)

CHAIRS:

Peter P. Li, California State University, Stanislaus, USA
Paul W.L. Vlaar, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Dries Faems, University of Twente, The Netherlands

Research on trust and distrust in inter-organizational relations – such as alliances, joint ventures, and outsourcing initiatives – has grown rapidly over the last decades. The majority of this research adopts a positive stance towards trust, showing its favorable association with relational quality (Ariño et al. 2001; Lusch & Brown 1996), cooperative behavior (Ferrin et al. 2005; Son et al. 2005), reciprocity (Serva et al. 2005), learning (Inkpen & Currall 2004), problem-solving (Boersma et al. 2003), information sharing (Gulati et al. 1994; Faems et al. 2007), conflict resolution (Das & Teng 2001; Koeszegi 2004), the propensity to conduct investments (Patnayakuni et al. 2006; Poppo & Zenger 2002; Rus & Iglic 2005), governance costs (Gulati & Nickerson 2008; Rustagi et al. 2008), and inter-organizational performance in general (Luo 2002; Palmatier et al. 2007).

Recent work (e.g. Cook et al.; 2005; Faems et al., 2008; Robson et al. 2008; Vlaar et al., 2007), however, suggests that trust may be less vital and beneficial to collaborative endeavors than originally expected.. Researchers have argued, for example, that collaborative ventures may take place in the absence of trust, and that the significance of trust hinges upon organizational, relational and environmental contingencies (Carson et al., 2006; Hoetker 2005; Krishnan et al. 2006; Mesquita 2007). Others have pointed to the significant investments and costs that creating, maintaining and restoring trust might bring along. (Gillespie & Dietz 2009). In addition, several researchers have touched upon the ‘dark side’ of trust, noting that it may encourage actors to suspend their judgment of others, accept information at face value and exhibit limited alertness. In this way, the presence of trust might increase the probability of opportunistic exploitation and/or might reduce the ability to respond to new business opportunities (Anderson & Jap 2005; Carson et al. 2006; Mesquita 2007; Stewart & Gosain 2006). In this session, we wish to explore these issues by discussing papers on the conditions and contingency factors that influence the relevance of trust in inter-organizational relations. Some possible research topics could be:

• Trust as a (un)necessary and trust as a (un)sufficient condition for inter-organizational collaboration;
• Organizational and environmental factors increasing the salience of the dark side of trust;
• The performance implications of various conceptualizations/measurements of trust across distinct inter-organizational settings;
• The development of collaboration in the presence of distrust and in the absence of trust;
• The interplay between trust, distrust, mistrust, opportunistic behavior, and control;
• Factors affecting the ability of trading partners to “read” each other and to “signal” their own trustworthiness or mask their untrustworthiness.

Multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary contributions are encouraged, including contributions from psychology, sociology, organizational behavior and theory, and economics. In addition, authors are asked to submit work building on various methods, including case studies, surveys, simulations, and other types of studies.

Authors intending to participate are requested to upload an 800-1000 words abstract of their work by June 1 2009.
By June 20 they will receive a notification of acceptance/rejection. Final papers of 6.000-10.000 words and 1,5 spacing should be uploaded at this website by November 21 2009.

The following information is required in the abstract:
- Title of paper.
- Name, academic affiliation(s) and address of author(s).
- E-mail address of each author

If you want to submit an abstract to this special session, please go to the "call for papers" section and upload your abstract electronically.

Please do not forget to mention that it is submitted for THIS SPECIAL SESSION by using the 'scroll down menu' you will see when submitting.

SPECIAL SESSION(S) X: TRUST WITHIN AND BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONS IN THE THIRD SECTOR AND PUBLIC SECTOR

CHAIRS :

Fergus Lyon, Middlesex University, UK
Malin Tillmar, Linköping University, Sweden

While there has been much attention to issues of trust within and between private sector organizations, there has been less attention given to trust in the context of the public sector and the third sector, defined here as as the voluntary organizations, social enterprises and other parts of the civil society. This session aims to bring together papers that can contribute to the development of scholarly insights on trust by looking at trust in the non private sector. We also aim at enhancing our understanding of which approaches, both theoretically and methodologically are best suited to look at issues of trust within and between public sector and/or third sector/non profit organizations.

While there is well developed research on citizen trust in government, there are opportunities for more research that examines the inter-organizational relationships and intra organisational relationships within these sectors. With shifting theoretical perspectives in public sector management, there are opportunities for trust researchers to make contributions to understand how relationships are built up, how they are maintained and how they are repaired. Thus, there are complex patterns of trust between service-providers, public organisations and citizens/users. These are changing dramatically with new relationships arising in the ‘quasi markets’ for public services, the use of individual budgets for delivering some services and the increase in competition for provision of public services in some countries.

Furthermore there are interesting innovative approaches to intra and inter-organizational relationship within civil society such as cooperative movements and more democratic forms of governance. This call welcomes papers that explore the nature of these alternatives to hierarchical forms of management and examine issue of trust and power within these organisations and forms of organising.

We are therefore looking for papers that examine:
• The nature of inter organisational relationships in the public and third sector
• How the public and or third sector create different environments for understanding trust
• Intra organisational relationships in the public sector
• Intra organisational relationships in third sector organisations, particularly those with more democratic or cooperative management systems
• Relationships between the public and third sector providers
• Relationships of users of services and the public or third sector providers
• Implications of trust research for public policy formulation, third sector strategy development and implementation.

Authors intending to participate are requested to upload an 800-1000 words abstract of their work by June 1 2009.
By June 20
they will receive a notification of acceptance/rejection. Final papers of 6.000-10.000 words and 1,5 spacing should be uploaded at this website by November 21 2009.

The following information is required in the abstract:
- Title of paper.
- Name, academic affiliation(s) and address of author(s).
- E-mail address of each author

If you want to submit an abstract to this special session, please go to the "call for papers" section and upload your abstract electronically.

Please do not forget to mention that it is submitted for THIS SPECIAL SESSION by using the 'scroll down menu' you will see when submitting.

PRACTICALITIES

The workshop will start around 8:30 am on January 28 and will end around 5 pm on the following day.


LOCATION

The Workshop will take place in the

NH Eurobuilding
http://www.nh-hoteles.es/nh/es/hoteles/espana/madrid/nh-eurobuilding.html

Padre Damián, 23.
28036 Madrid 
Tel. +34.91.3537300
Fax: +34.91.3454576 
E-mail:
nheurobuilding@nh-hotels.com 


ACCOMMODATION

A number of rooms have been pre-booked by the local organizers in the workshop hotel.
We advise you to book your room as soon as possible.
To make your booking, please indicated "TRUST CONFERENCE"

Prices of rooms :
Double room: 145 €+7% VAT
Double room (individual use): 130 €+7% VAT

Please click HERE to download the NH Eurobuilding booking form.

Please click HERE to have a list of hotels located in the workshop surroundings.


FEES

 

   
For participants affiliated with an institution that is member or associate member of the EIASM's
Academic Council
280 €
For participants coming from another academic institution 330 €

Cancellations made before January 5, 2010 will be reimbursed minus 20% of the total fee. No reimbursement will be possible after that date.

Payments should be made by :

  • The following credit cards: Visa or Eurocard/Mastercard/Access

DOWNLOAD LIST OF PARTICIPANTS

DOWNLOAD ACCEPTED PAPERS

ADMINISTRATION

Ms. Graziella Michelante - EIASM Conference Manager
EIASM - PLACE DE BROUCK√ąRE-PLEIN - 31 - 1000 BRUSSELS - BELGIUM
Tel: +32 2 226 66 62 - Fax: +32 2 512 19 29
Email: michelante@eiasm.be